Too many sugars, too many additives: the candy changes recipes – Ouest-France

Halloween, it's tonight! It's a nightmarish night for parents attentive to the teeth of their offspring. In the little game of candy or fate, the first usually wins. The period is therefore important for a candy market that trembles with the phenomenon of "Sugar bashing".

France, with a little over 3 kg consumed per year and per capita, is only 11th in Europe. | RVNW – FOTOLIA


  • PwMlgHHUgFEDgAAgwAD+lBrvy+NcxAAAAABJRU5ErkJggg== - Too many sugars, too many additives: the candy changes recipes - Ouest-France
    France, with a little over 3 kg consumed per year and per capita, is only 11th in Europe. | RVNW – FOTOLIA

The candy no longer has fries! Too many sugars, dyes, additives and gelatin … The French want to eat better and the consumption of treats suffers.

Production has decreased by 1% in 2018 and by 11% in the last five years, from 163 million tonnes to 145 million between 2014 and 2018. This was the result of the Xerfi Institute forecasts published in February.

Haribo vs Lutti

This decline is partly due to the industrial restructuring carried out by the German giant Haribo. It has announced the removal of 110 positions in France, all sites. The manufacture of its famous Chamallows was relocated in Belgium. And the group is counting on the commissioning of a new plant in Germany planned for 2020.

A strategy totally opposite to that deployed by CPK. The holding hexagonal, which already owned the marks Carambar, Poulain, Krema and La Pie Qui Chante, was authorized in late 2018 by the Competition Authority to take exclusive control of Lutti, the manufacturer based in the North. The new set is based on 100% French manufacturing. A strong axis to gain especially export shares.

PwMlgHHUgFEDgAAgwAD+lBrvy+NcxAAAAABJRU5ErkJggg== - Too many sugars, too many additives: the candy changes recipes - Ouest-France
The candy market in France. | WEST-FRANCE INFOGRAPHY

The french little fond of sweets

The fall in production is also a symptom of low consumption in the domestic market. On the distribution side, this translates into a 2.8% reduction in sales in supermarkets and hypermarkets (GMS), which is still a majority (80%). The turnover reached 1.38 billion euros at the end of August 2018 against 1.42 billion a year earlier. France, with a little over 3 kg consumed per year and per capita, is only 11th in Europe. We are far behind Sweden (7.7 kg).

Yet, the purchasing power of households is rising and the teenage population, particularly willing to consume candies, is progressing. It is therefore the public health policies and changing consumer expectations that are shaking the sector. Even if confectionery uses only 3.3% of the sugar produced for human consumption, the time has come to question.

More transparency, less additives

This moult resulted in a code of ethics signed in June 2018 by confectioners of France. It aims to bring more transparency to the label and to continue the work on advertising, especially for children, to fight against obesity. It gives priority to natural dyes, vegetarian ranges or less sweet and especially formalizes the elimination in the recipes of titanium dioxide (E171) by 2020.

Lutti, for example, has made its success on pungent and acidic sweets – ruthless cocktail for our teeth. The company is now promoting on its website the development of gluten-free, vegetarian, sugar-reduced or sugar-free products.

To help smaller companies better meet the expectations of consumers and civil society on the composition of confectionery, the charter also provides for the establishment of a "fund for the formulation of revenue".

All this upscaling of the sector is accompanied by a return of tradition and a taste of consumers for the confectionery of yesteryear. While chewing gums recorded a decline in sales of 5.2% in volume in 2018 in supermarkets, specialty products such as nougat, candied fruits and calissons grew by 4.8%.

In this context, but also to strengthen export, industry players are now seeking to better protect the French and regional know-how, through Appellations of Protected Origin (PDO) or protected geographical indications (PGI). Enough to induce French consumers to give in to temptation, for the good cause: that of local traditions!

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