Nine hundred and eighty-six positions will be cut at Nokia France, instead of the 1,233 planned. A "Significant progress", the government was delighted this weekend, whose goal was to go below the 1,000 mark to ensure its communication and wrest a tacit promise not to initiate further layoffs before the next elections. "We are really far from the mark", believes Claude Josserand, central union delegate (DSC) CGT Nokia.

Nokia. A social plan stuffed with public money L39Humanite - Nokia. A social plan stuffed with public money - L'HumanitéWe are really far from it. Claude Josserand, central union representative CGT

The majority of the 247 posts saved will be in Lannion, in the Côtes-d´Armor, which grants a reprieve for this site which was otherwise doomed at short notice. This compromise was negotiated between the group's management and the cabinet of the Secretary of State for Industry. The CFDT was able to participate in discussion sessions, but not the inter-union, held in ignorance. For the management, the aim was clearly to explode union unity. However, this is holding up so far, and no one is really satisfied with this small step forward. "Cosmetic", in the words of Frédéric Aussedat, of the CFE-CGC.

Nokia. A social plan stuffed with public money L39Humanite - Nokia. A social plan stuffed with public money - L'HumanitéNot only was it already a promise made in 2015, never kept, but today it is no longer even a commitment, it is a simple ambition. Philippe Mulot, union representative CGT

Once again, these saved posts will be saved with a lot of public money. Nokia will receive 28 million euros over three years from the recovery plan. With the idea of ​​creating a European cybersecurity center in Lannion, with around a hundred positions. "Not only was it already a promise made in 2015, never kept, but today it is no longer even a commitment, it is a simple ambition", sighs Philippe Mulot, CGT Nokia union delegate in Lannion. The project would however make sense. Anchoring security at the heart of networks would be relevant in view of the debates on Huawei and the suspicions of cyber espionage. But, given the company's liabilities, it's hard to believe. "Jean-Yves Le Drian has already come to inaugurate a building at the time, the ambition was even to erect a world center for cybersecurity, says Philippe Mulot. Nokia had brought in a few engineers from Paris, to pretend to work, for the day. Today the building is still empty. "

A shortfall for research

These 28 million euros of public money will be added to the 280 million tax credit that the telecoms company has already received since 2015 and the acquisition of Alcatel. "Of which 273 million research tax credit (CIR), this is money taken from public research, including health", deplores Philippe Mulot. And the Finnish group has particularly abused the CIR system, as the expert firm Syndex noted in its latest report in late September. To get around tax credit limits, the group has maintained an old subsidiary of Alcatel, Evolium, without any employees. Nokia made available, free of charge, hundreds of engineers who were not even aware of it, which allowed Evolium to benefit from 32 to 34 million euros in CIR, depending on the year, in addition what the other subsidiaries were getting. The unions have appointed a tax law firm to hold the issue to account.

Conversely, when it comes to paying taxes in France, the multinational is more reluctant. “Nokia France under-invoices all our services, research and development, sales or support to the parent company, which keeps us in deficit, allows us to avoid paying corporate tax and employee profit-sharing. and justifies all economic plans ”, summarizes Claude Josserand. "This results in transferring the benefit of the CIR abroad", concludes Syndex.