Forgotten Concept – Ferrari Modulo (1970) – Motor1.com France

Like many manufacturers in the 70s and 80s, Ferrari did not cut back on the attempt to make one of its cars a futuristic model, by reinterpreting it in a completely new way. And besides, when we see the Modulo, designed in 1970, it is hard to believe that it was based on a Ferrari 512S. Converted into a 612 Can Am chassis, the trays meeting the regulations of the same name, it was then completely stripped bare so that Pininfarina could make its own interpretation of a car of the future.

Paolo Martin was responsible for giving the pencil strokes that led to the design of the Modulo, and he is also the father of the Peugeot 104, the Triumph Spitfire, or even the majestic Rolls-Royce Camargue. He had also reinterpreted the Citroën 2CV with a modern concept in 2008. For the Modulo, he wanted to make a car that drew many concepts from aviation, starting with its overall line, as well as with its opening of the cockpit.

Forgotten Concept Ferrari Modulo 1970 Motor1.com France - Forgotten Concept - Ferrari Modulo (1970) - Motor1.com France
1577711525 664 Forgotten Concept Ferrari Modulo 1970 Motor1.com France - Forgotten Concept - Ferrari Modulo (1970) - Motor1.com France

Indeed, with 93.5 cm in height by 4.48 meters long and a width slightly greater than 2 meters, the Modulo is cut with a bill hook and has a very aerodynamic profile, as well as a very low center of gravity, but it is especially at the level of its bubble, if you can call it that, that it stands out. Indeed, this concept has a single door, mounted on jacks, which also includes the windshield. This fighter-like technology gives this car a singular air, just as much as the bodywork that fully encompasses it. Indeed, for more aero efficiency, the four wheels are cambered. Behind the cockpit, the body has 24 ventilation holes representing the 12 cylinders of the engine.

Performance worthy of the 2010s

In fact, beneath this strange body is a 5.0-liter V12 developing 550 horsepower, which transmits power to the rear wheels via a five-speed manual gearbox. It is capable of reaching the speed of 354 km / h and shooting the 0 to 100 km / h in just over three seconds. This coupé "a door" weighs 900 kilos and made its debut at the 1970 Geneva Motor Show, with a livery colored at the time, and was later repainted in white.

1577711528 131 Forgotten Concept Ferrari Modulo 1970 Motor1.com France - Forgotten Concept - Ferrari Modulo (1970) - Motor1.com France
1577711530 616 Forgotten Concept Ferrari Modulo 1970 Motor1.com France - Forgotten Concept - Ferrari Modulo (1970) - Motor1.com France

Inside, the dashboard is very simple, just like the steering wheel, whose hub is integrated with the other elements. The driver and passenger have two fairly large spheres next to them, which serve as a multifunction control and ventilation outlet. The different gauges are distributed over the entire dashboard, including in front of the passenger.

The Ferrari Modulo has won exactly 22 design awards over the course of its career, for its innovative aspect that has never been seen elsewhere. Do you think she is spending a quiet retirement in a museum today? Not at all ! The famous director, entrepreneur and designer of supercars, James Glickenhaus, bought this unique model in 2014 and is currently working to transform it into a model in perfect working order. If we can't wait to see this strange piece of history on the road, we also hope that nothing will happen to it, in order to keep it in good condition and to still be able to admire its unique lines.

Categories Cars

Leave a Comment