Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado – Dalloz actualité

It’s a decision that will cause a stir (Civ. 1re, September 30, 2020, n ° 18-19.241, PWC). Undoubtedly one of the most important decisions of the Court of Cassation for a long time. The solution is simple and can be summed up in a few words: the negative effect of the competence-competence principle does not require, in an international contract, to refer the consumer to the arbitrator to discuss competence. The consequences are staggering. We will also take advantage of this column to comment on the other judgments rendered in arbitration. The period is calm, since we will only mention five other stops, of which only the stop Samwell is of real interest (Paris, Sept. 15, 2020, n ° 19/09058).

I – Arbitration and consumer

Before returning to the judgment, let us recall the positive law as it existed on September 29, 2020.

The starting point is simple: who, the state judge or the arbitrator, should decide the parties' disputes over jurisdiction in the presence of an arbitration clause? The competence of the arbitrator to hear them has not been discussed for a long time; we are talking about the positive effect of the competence-competence principle. It remains to be seen whether this competence of the arbitrator to examine his competence is exclusive or alternative to that of the state judge. The answer is found in article 1448 of the Code of Civil Procedure, which states that “when a dispute arising from an arbitration agreement is brought before a state court, the latter declares itself incompetent unless the court arbitration is not yet seized and if the arbitration agreement is manifestly null or manifestly inapplicable ”. This is the meaning of the negative effect of the competence-competence principle: only the arbitrator is competent to examine his own competence, the state judge having only the power to carry out an examination. prima facie very limited of this question (E. Gaillard, The negative effect of competence-competence. Procedural and arbitration studies in honor of Jean-François Poudret, Lausanne, 1999, p. 387; Mr. Boucaron-Nardetto, The competence-competence principle in arbitration law, pref. J.-B. Racine, PUAM, 2013).

The solution, already discussed in principle, raises serious objections in certain areas, foremost among which is labor law and consumer law. Indeed, the employee or the consumer, if he intends to avail himself of the protective provisions of labor or consumer law, is forced to refer the matter to the arbitrator in order to obtain from him an award of incompetence before coming back to court. the courts so that they can examine the merits. It is easily understood that the solution does not satisfy those in favor of increased protection of parties deemed to be weak.

It is therefore logical that case law has dealt with this situation for a long time. In labor law, the answer differs depending on whether we are in internal or international matters. In international matters, it is the unenforceability of the arbitration clause that is retained (Soc. 16 Feb. 1999, n ° 96-40.643, Bull. Civ. V, n ° 78; Report Cour de cassation 1999, p. 328 ; D. 1999. 74 Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; Dr. soc. 1999. 632, obs. MY. Moreau Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; Rev. crit. DIP 1999. 745, note F. Jault-Seseke Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; Rev. arb. 1999. 290 (1re esp.), notes M.-A. Moreau; JCP E 1999, p. 1685, note P. Coursier; JCP E 1999, p. 748, obs. F. Cleat; Gas. Pal. 2000. Somm. p. 699 (1re esp.), obs. M.-L. Niboyet; LPA 2000, n ° 158, p. 4 (1re esp.), obs. F. Jault-Seseke; J. Pelissier, A. Lyon-Caen, A. Jeammaud and E. Dockes, Major labor law decisions, Dalloz, 3e ed. 2004., n ° 26). It allows the worker to appeal to the state judge by invoking the unenforceability of the clause, which avoids the discussion on jurisdiction. In domestic matters, the competence-competence principle is inapplicable (Soc. 30 Nov. 2011, no.bone 11-12.905 and 11-12.906, D. 2011. 3002 Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; ibid. 2012. 2991, obs. T. Clay Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; Dr. soc. 2012. 309, obs. B. Gauriau Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; RTD com. 2012. 351, obs. A. Constantine Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; ibid. 528, obs. E. Loquin Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité; Rev. arb. 2012. 333, notes M. Boucaron-Nardetto (1re decision.); JCP 2012. 843, § 2, obs. C. Seraglini; ibid. 2011. 2518, obs. N. Dedessus-Le-Moustier; JCP S 2012, n ° 5, p. 42, note S. Brissy; Procedures 2012. Comm. 42, obs. L. Weiller; ibid. Comm. 75, obs. A. Bugada; DRC 2012. 539, note X. Boucobza and Y.-M. Serinet). The state judge is fully competent to know the validity of the clause.

On the other hand, the situation is more complex in consumer law. In internal matters, the consumer benefits, since the law of November 18, 2016 and in addition to the consumer code, from the rule of the unenforceability of the arbitration clause, provided for by article 2061 of the civil code (C. Jarrosson et al. J.-B. Racine, The provisions relating to arbitration in the law on the modernization of justice of the XXIe century, Rev. arb. 2016. 1007, n ° 23). On the other hand, the international contract, even though it is a consumer contract, did not benefit from a specific regime. By two stops, Jaguar (Civ. 1re, May 21, 1997, nbone 95-11.429 and 95-11.427 (2 stops), RTD com. 1998. 330, obs. J.-C. Dubarry and E. Loquin; Rev. crit. DIP 1998, 87, note V. Heuzé; NY. L. J. Dec. 4 1997, obs. E. Gaillard; Dr. and patr. 1997, n ° 1800, obs. P. Laroche de Roussane; RGDP 1998. 156, obs. M.-C. Rivier; Rev. arb. 1997. 537, note E. Gaillard; JDI 1998. 969, note S. Poillot-Peruzzetto) and Rado (Civ. 1re, March 30, 2004, n ° 02-12.259, D. 2004. 2458 Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité , note I. Najjar Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; ibid. 2005. 3050, obs. T. Clay Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; RTD com. 2004. 447, obs. E. Loquin Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; Rev. arb. 2005. 115, note X. Boucobza; JCP 2005. I. 134, § 3, obs. C. Seraglini), the Court of Cassation referred the examination of jurisdiction to the arbitral tribunal, thus strictly applying the negative effect of the jurisdiction-jurisdiction principle. It is precisely on these two solutions that the judgment returns PWC.

The case concerns an inheritance in Spain. In order to be assisted during this procedure, one of the heirs uses a Spanish consulting firm belonging to a law firm with international activity. Following a dispute with the latter, the heir seized the French courts. In defense, the law firm raises an objection of incompetence in favor of the arbitral tribunal (and in the alternative, in favor of the Spanish courts. This point will not be discussed, but will undoubtedly be the subject of comments by specialists in the Private International Law). In support of his argument, the defendant relies on the principle of competence-competence and requests that the examination of competence be carried out by the arbitrator as soon as the clause is not manifestly null or inapplicable. However, before the Versailles Court of Appeal, the objection of incompetence was dismissed and the jurisdiction of the French courts retained (Versailles, 15 Feb. 2018, n ° 17/03779, LPA 2018, n ° 135, p. 13 , obs. C. Jalicot). The Versailles Court of Appeal made no secret of his approach. She stated that "the court (…) will examine (…) the value and scope of the arbitration clause contained in this first agreement to rule on the exception of incompetence upheld by the company PWC". In doing so, it is in violation of the competence-competence principle. Once freed from the negative effect of the principle, she examines the validity of the clause. Here again, the reasoning is striking. In essence, the appellate court stated that the clause was not subject to "individual negotiation" and that it was "standardized in nature". Consequently, it considers the clause to be unfair. Finally, the Versailles Court of Appeal recognizes that it has jurisdiction to settle the dispute, in application of Regulation No. 1215/2012 of December 12, 2012, known as Brussels 1 bis, on the grounds that the company PWC “directs its activities to several States including France and Spain, Member States of the European Union, which justifies the application to the present case of the combined provisions of Articles 17 c and 18 of Brussels I regulation bis and allows the jurisdiction of a French court to be retained ".

An appeal is logically lodged against this judgment and should have entailed the cassation, the Court of Appeal of Versailles having openly violated the principle of competence-competence. It is not and the appeal is dismissed. In summary (the motivation is extensive), the Court states that “the procedural rule of priority enacted by this text cannot have the effect of making it impossible, or excessively difficult, to exercise the rights conferred on consumers by Community law. national courts have an obligation to safeguard ”. As a result, the competence-competence principle is ignored. It then adds that the defendant "did not demonstrate that the standardized clause obliging the non-professional client to refer, in the event of a dispute, to an arbitration court, had been the subject of individual negotiation". The clause is therefore set aside. Finally, it confirms the jurisdiction of the French courts, on the grounds that “the law firm PWC directed its professional activity beyond the territorial sphere of its attached bar, by offering its services to an international clientele, domiciled in particular in France , so that in her capacity as consumer, (the plaintiff), domiciled in France, could bring her action before the French courts ”.

Some see in this decision a new hypothesis of manifest nullity of the clause. This is not the analysis that we make of it, even if the reading of the judgment is far from obvious. The articulation of the judgment seems revealing to us. In examining the first part of the first plea, the Court implicitly rejects the negative effect of the competence-competence principle; this allows him, in the examination of the other branches of the plea, to support the analysis of the Court of Appeal of Versailles to set aside the clause. There are therefore two stages in the reasoning: on the one hand, the exclusion of the competence-competence principle (A) and, on the other hand, the condemnation of clause (B). However, it is questionable whether another approach is not possible (C).

A – Elimination of the competence-competence principle

The consecration of a new solution in international consumer contracts is not surprising. She had been anticipated for a long time and it is likely that only the opportunity was missing. In doctrine, several remarkable works have supported an evolution in this area (M. de Fontmichel, The weak and the arbitrage, pref. by T. Clay, Economica, 2013; J. Clavel, The denial of economic justice in international arbitration. The negative effect of the competence-competence principle, ss the dir. by G. Khairallah, thesis Paris II, nbone 331 s. ; C. Seraglini, The Weak Parties in International Arbitration, Seeking a Balance, Gaz. Pal. 2007, n ° 349, p. 5, No. 26; lastly, C. Seraglini and J. Ortscheidt, Internal and international arbitration law, Domat, Private Law, LGDJ, 2019, n ° 662). Moreover, it cannot be ignored that the Court of Justice, without expressly saying so, called for the adoption of such a solution (CJCE 26 Oct. 2006, case C-168/05, Mme Mostaza Claro c / Centro Movil Milenium SL, D. 2006. 2910, obs. V. Avena-Robardet Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; ibid. 3026, obs. T. Clay Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; ibid. 2007. 2562, obs. L. d'Avout and S. Bollée Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; RTD civ. 2007. 113, obs. J. Mestre and B. Fages Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; ibid. 633, obs. P. Thery Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; JDI 2007. 581, note A. Mourre; Rev. arb. 2007. 109, note L. Idot; JCP 2007. I. 168, § 1, obs. C. Seraglini; Gas. Pal. April 29-May 3, 2007, p. 17, obs. F.-X. Train; LPA 2007, n ° 152, p. 9, obs. C. Legros; ibid., n ° 189, p. 9, note G. Poissonier and J.-P. Tricoit; RDAI 2007, n ° 14, p. 55, obs. C. Nourissat; Europe 2006, n ° 378, p. 28, obs. L. Idot). To analyze the decision, it is necessary to come back to the motivation expressed (1), the suggested foundations (2) and the undefined scope (3).

1 – The expressed motivation

European law is at the heart of the reasoning of the Court of Cassation. Indeed, the French legislation on unfair terms results from a transposition of Council Directive 93/13 / EEC of April 5, 1993. The Cour de cassation resumed Verbatim the reasons for a decision rendered by the Court of Justice concerning this text (CJEU 20 Sept. 2018, aff. C-51/17, § 89, D. 2018. 1861 Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; ibid. 2019. 279, obs. Mr. Mekki Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; ibid. 607, obs. H. Aubry, E. Poillot and N. Sauphanor-Brouillaud Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité; ibid. 2009, obs. D. R. Martin and H. Synvet Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; AJ contract 2018. 431, obs. E. Bazin Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité): "Given the nature and importance of the public interest on which the protection that Directive 93/13 provides to consumers is based, Article 6 thereof must be considered as a standard equivalent to the national rules which occupy, within the internal legal order, the rank of public order standards ”. Two interesting elements can already be pointed out. First, unfair term law is not seen as merely protecting the private interests of consumers. It also guarantees the public interest. Second, it is this preservation of public interests that justifies integration into public order standards (see in this regard in arbitration, J. Jourdan-Marques, State control of international arbitral awards, LGDJ, coll. “Private Law Library”, 2017, n ° 160, pref. T. Clay, nbone 503 s.).

Once this point has been established, the Court of Cassation proceeds with its reasoning. It states that it is necessary to "provide adequate and effective means in order to put an end to the use of unfair terms in contracts" and that, "among the adequate and effective means to guarantee consumers a right to an effective remedy must include the possibility of lodging an appeal or filing an opposition under reasonable procedural conditions, so that the exercise of their rights is not subject to conditions, in particular time limits or costs, which reduce the exercise of rights guaranteed by Directive 93/13 / EEC ”. However, procedural arrangements should "not make it impossible in practice or excessively difficult to exercise the rights conferred by the Community legal order". At this stage, the Court has already sounded the death knell for the competence-competence principle. It is only up to him to conclude. This is what it does, by stressing that “the procedural rule of priority enacted by this text cannot have the effect of making it impossible, or excessively difficult, to exercise the rights conferred on consumers by Community law that the courts national authorities have an obligation to safeguard ”and that, therefore,“ the Court of Appeal which, after examining its applicability, taking into account all the necessary elements of law and fact at its disposal, rejected the arbitration clause because of its abusive nature, has, without disregarding the provisions of article 1448 of the code of civil procedure, fulfilled its office of state judge to which it is incumbent to ensure the full effectiveness of the community law of consumer protection ”.

We are doubly frustrated by motivation. On the one hand, the Court of Cassation endeavors to lay the foundations for its decision, by recalling in several successive paragraphs, which we have presented, the value of consumer protection against unfair terms and the meaning of European case law. . We can rejoice in this enriched motivation, carefully chosen. However, at no time does the Court of Cassation explain how the negative effect of the competence-competence principle has the effect of making it impossible or excessively difficult to exercise the rights conferred on the consumer. So of course, we can say that the answer is obvious, and it surely is. Indeed, one can hardly expect the consumer to refer the matter to the arbitrator for the sole purpose of obtaining a decision of incompetence in order to seize the state judge. However, why not say so explicitly? On the other hand, we are a little surprised by the conclusion on this first branch of the first plea. While the preceding reasoning essentially aimed to highlight the importance of a right to an effective remedy for the consumer and the problem revealed by the negative effect of the principle of competence-competence, the Court responds only to the substance by approving the court of appeal for having set aside the arbitration clause. However, it is not the same thing to wonder, on the one hand, about the application of the competence-competence principle to a consumer and, on the other hand, about the validity of the clause with regard to him.

This is what makes the analysis of the judgment particularly delicate. Did the Court really decide to set aside the competence-competence principle? It seems to us that the answer is positive. At no time is an inapplicability or manifest nullity envisaged. On the contrary, it is a thorough examination of the clause which is carried out, the Court of Cassation holding that the Court of Appeal took into account "all the elements of law and of fact necessary at its disposal". If the Court of Appeal did not "disregard the provisions of Article 1448 of the Code of Civil Procedure", it is because the Court of Cassation had to consider that the negative effect was not applicable in many cases. such circumstances. But what is the mechanism at work?

2 – The suggested foundation

If we understand that European consumer protection legislation has particular value in the eyes of the Court of Cassation and that the negative effect of the competence-competence principle is an obstacle to its effectiveness, we still have to reading of the judgment, skeptical about the mechanism at work to achieve the result. Essentially, the Court of Cassation highlights "the importance of the public interest on which the protection" of the consumer is based and thus qualifies the rule "of standards of public order". However, this motivation is insufficient to explain the exclusion from the provisions of the Code of Civil Procedure.

Some will no doubt be tempted to see at work techniques derived from private international law, in particular a police law. Indeed, this would not be the first time that a European provision has taken on such a qualification (CJCE 9 Nov. 2000, aff. C-381/98, Rev. crit. DIP 2001. 107, note L. Idot Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; JDI 2001. 517, note J.-M. Jacquet). However, the qualification does not seem appropriate to us: the overriding law is intended to intervene in a situation of conflict of laws, precluding the rule of conflict in advance. Nothing like that in this case, since it is a French procedural rule that is being ousted!

On the other hand, two more satisfactory and ultimately simpler explanations can be put forward. The first is to retain an application of the principle specialia generalibus derogant : the need to ensure the consumer a right to an effective remedy under reasonable procedural conditions constitutes a special rule which derogates from the general rule set by Article 1448 of the Code of Civil Procedure. The second is a little different, but has similar consequences. It is a question of considering that the Court of Cassation is carrying out a banal examination of conventionality. The directive, secondary European law, and its interpretation by the Court of Justice, being superior to the Code of Civil Procedure, a regulatory text, the opposition of the second to the former makes it possible to rule out the negative effect of the competence-competence principle. This is undoubtedly the meaning of § 13 of the judgment, where the Court states that “the procedural rule of priority laid down by this text cannot have the effect of making it impossible or excessively difficult to exercise the rights conferred on the consumer by Community law which national courts have an obligation to safeguard ”.

In fact, neither of these explanations strikes us as fully consistent with the letter of the decision. The first does not require the identification of a rule of particular value (public policy) in order to be implemented, although the Court particularly insists on this aspect. The second leads to retain only a conflict between a European standard and an internal standard, where the Court seems to hesitate between the use of the directive or the consumer law (it speaks thus of the value of the rule in "the order internal legal "). Otherwise, the Court of Cassation gave almost too much reason for its decision, which makes it difficult to identify the solution. It remains to determine the scope.

3 – The indeterminate scope

at. An uncertain scope

Determining the scope of the solution presents a considerable challenge. It should in fact not spread, by capillarity, to other areas. Otherwise, one of the main mechanisms for protecting arbitral jurisdiction would be over.

Quite logically, it is first necessary to determine the personal scope of the principle. A priori, the answer is not difficult: it applies in a relationship between a professional and a consumer. Still, the solution may not be so obvious. On the one hand, we note that the definition of consumer and professional is distinct between Article 2 of the directive and the introductory article of the Consumer Code. Which of the two should we remember? On the other hand, it will be recalled that Article L. 212-2 of the Consumer Code extends the benefit of the mechanism on unfair terms to non-professionals. Should it therefore benefit from the exclusion of the competence-competence principle? Logically, if it is indeed a control of conventionality that has been carried out, it should be necessary to stick to the European text (except to carry out a control of legality between art. L. 212-1 c. consom. and art. 1448 c. civ. pr.?). It is different if the Court has opted for an articulation between general rule and special rule …

Second, we have to wonder about a possible spatial scope of the solution. To put it simply: should the competence-competence principle be set aside in all consumer contracts around the world when it comes before a French judge? Let's take an example to illustrate the problem. An American consumer acquires the product from a French professional doing business on American soil. The contract contains an arbitration clause. Can the consumer avail himself of European law to have the competence-competence principle set aside and to refer the matter to the French courts? Behind, there is a real question of the scope of the text. However, the risk is to fall into a reasoning of research of the law applicable to the contract. Such reasoning would be, first of all, eminently complex for a consumer, and above all, perfectly illogical. It leads not only to making the jurisdiction of the judge dependent on the law applicable to the contract (which is a classic problem), but above all to ignoring the legal independence of the arbitration clause from the main contract. It is therefore preferable to set a scope without forcing the parties and the judge to convolutions.

b. A potential for expansion to be feared

From the point of view of the arbitration, this decision is an additional blow of knife with the negative effect competence-competence, which begins to be seriously weakened (v. Equal. The use of the principle of estoppel to defeat the principle , Civ. 1re, 28 Feb 2018, n ° 16-27.823, D. 2018. 2448, obs. T. Clay Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; RTD civ. 2018. 482, obs. N. Cayrol Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; Gas. Pal. 2018, n ° 27, p. 19, obs. D. Bensaude; JDI 2018. Comm. 18, note J. Jourdan-Marques). There is the exception, already mentioned, of the employment contract, which is already a first strain. But is there not to be fear that a tidal wave will eventually take the whole thing? Indeed, it cannot be ignored that the attempts to challenge the clause at the pre-arbitration stage are increasingly important. Thus, we are familiar with the discussions around the clause in the presence of an impecunious party or a non-signatory third party. Case law also suggests that the significant imbalance could be such as to call into question, at least at the stage of the review of the award, the arbitration clause (J. Jourdan-Marques, Chronique d'arbitrage: arbitrage à l test of significant imbalance, Dalloz actualité, July 29, 2020).

We can also fear that the principle will end up giving way in the presence of European legislation. In the present judgment, setting aside the competence-competence principle rests as much, if not more, on the European source of consumer protection legislation as on the fragility of the consumer. One of the key passages is the mention of the principle of effectiveness (§ 11). This states that the procedural provisions of the Member States must not make it "impossible in practice or excessively difficult to exercise the rights conferred by the Community legal order". Yet it is precisely this principle that is repeated in the decisive paragraph (§ 13). The problem stems from the fact that the principle of effectiveness does not only concern the consumer. Thus, in a judgment of July 7, 2017 (Cass., Mixed ch., July 7, 2017, n ° 15-25.651, D. 2017. 1800, press release C. cass. Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité , notes M. Bacache Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; ibid. 2018. 35, obs. P. Brun, O. Gout and C. Quézel-Ambrunaz Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; ibid. 583, obs. H. Aubry, E. Poillot and N. Sauphanor-Brouillaud Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; RTD civ. 2017. 829, obs. L. Usunier Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; ibid. 872, obs. P. Jourdain Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; ibid. 882, obs. P.-Y. Gautier Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; RTD eur. 2018. 341, obs. A. Jeauneau Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; RLDC 2017, n ° 151, p. 4, obs. B. Bernard; JCP 2017. 1580, note C. Quézel-Ambrunaz; Gas. Pal. 2017, n ° 34, p. 30, obs. N. White; ibid. n ° 37, p. 65, obs. N. Hoffschir; CCC 2017, n ° 11, p. 24, obs. L. Leveneur), the Court of Cassation, on the basis of the principle of effectiveness, enshrined an obligation for the judicial judge to automatically note the applicability of the provisions relating to defective products. Should we therefore consider that the competence-competence principle must also be set aside in the presence of an action relating to a defective product, on the basis of the principle of effectiveness? To follow such a direction, one risks quickly leading to a generalized inarbitrability of the disputes under European law, which would constitute a considerable step backwards.

It is essential to remember that if we want to protect consumers, it is not because European law requires it, but because they deserve special protection. We might as well assume this assumption and provide a protective framework for the latter, independent of European law, but respectful of it!

B – Condemnation of the clause

Once the negative effect of the competence-competence principle has been ruled out, the Court examines the criticisms relating to the validity of the arbitration clause. Let us recall the details, which are not mentioned in the judgment. The examination of an arbitration clause, which is in principle carried out at the post-arbitration stage, is part of the judgment Dalico : “By virtue of a substantive rule of international arbitration law, the arbitration clause is legally independent of the main contract which contains it directly or by reference and that its existence and effectiveness are assessed, subject to the mandatory rules of the French law and international public order, according to the common will of the parties, without it being necessary to refer to a state law ”(Civ. 1re, 20 Dec. 1993, No. 91-16.828, Rev. crit. DIP 1994. 663, note P. Mayer Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité; RTD com. 1994. 254, obs. J.-C. Dubarry and E. Loquin Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; Rev. arb. 1994. 116, notes H. Gaudemet-Tallon; JDI 1994. 432, note E. Gaillard). This judgment has two essential consequences: on the one hand, the examination of the arbitration clause is carried out against the sole substantive rule laid down by the decision; on the other hand, no national law applies to the clause, not even French domestic law (subject to the exception posed by the judgment). This second precision is important. It leads the case law, in the judgment Zanzi, to state that "Article 2061 of the Civil Code has no application in the international order" (Civ. 1re, 5 Jan. 1999, n ° 96-21.430, Zanzi c / Coninck, D. 1999. 31 Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; Rev. crit. DIP 1999. 546, note D. Bureau Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; RTD com. 1999. 380, obs. E. Loquin Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; Rev. arb. 1999.260, note P. Fouchard; RCDIP 1999.546, note D. Bureau; D. aff. 1999.291, obs. X. Delpech; RGDP 1999.409, obs. M.-C. Rivier; Dr et patr., 2000. 2514, obs. P. Mousseron; RDAI 1999.823, obs. C. Imhoos; RJDA 1999.360; Gas. Pal. Jan 9-11, 2000, p. 64; ibid. 13-14 October 2000, p. 10, obs. E. du Rusquec).

Consequently, one of two things: either the Court intends, in order to set aside the clause, to carry out an examination of the common will of the parties, or it wishes to invoke a mandatory rule of French law and international public order. . However, an examination of the second, third and fourth limbs of the first ground does not really reveal a choice in favor of either of these solutions.

Assez spontanément, on s’attendait à ce que la Cour reprenne le travail de qualification réalisé dans l’examen de la première branche et se prévale du « rang de normes d’ordre public » du dispositif relatif aux clauses abusives. La Cour s’est elle-même créé un boulevard pour examiner la validité de la clause au regard du droit de la consommation, règle impérative du droit français. Pourtant, telle ne semble pas être la démarche retenue, la Cour ne visant ni le droit de la consommation ni un quelconque caractère abusif de la clause. Autrement dit, la Cour semble plutôt à la recherche de la commune volonté des parties.

Pour ce faire, la Cour de cassation valide le raisonnement de la cour d’appel de Versailles, qui tient en trois temps : d’abord, elle regrette l’absence de preuve d’une négociation sur la clause ; ensuite, elle constate que la clause est une simple traduction de la clause type espagnole ; enfin, elle souligne que le consommateur n’était pas en mesure de négocier la clause dans un rapport équilibré. La Cour de cassation, tout en précisant que cette question relève de l’appréciation souveraine des juges du fond, énonce que « la société PWC ne démontrait pas que la clause standardisée obligeant le client non-professionnel à saisir, en cas de différend, une juridiction arbitrale, avait fait l’objet d’une négociation individuelle, a légalement justifié sa décision de ce chef ».

Les spécialistes de l’arbitrage feront le rapprochement entre cette motivation et celle de l’arrêt Prunier. Il y a 177 ans, la Cour de cassation signait le début de la cryogénisation de la clause compromissoire en expliquant notamment que « si l’on validait dans le cas d’assurances contre l’incendie la simple convention ou clause compromissoire, il faudrait reconnaître et consacrer sa validité dans tous les contrats (…) que cette stipulation deviendrait en quelque sorte banale et de pur style » (Civ. 10 juill. 1843, Prunier, S. 1843. 1. 561 ; D. 1843. 1. 343 ; Rev. arb. 1992. 399 ; Les grandes décisions du droit de l’arbitrage commercial, Dalloz, n° 1). Une fois encore, la clause compromissoire est stigmatisée pour ne pas avoir fait l’objet d’une négociation ad hoc.

On est tout de même étonné de voir que la critique des deux cours s’articule autour de l’absence de négociation individuelle de la clause. Cette approche semble confirmer que la Cour ne se situe pas sur le terrain de clauses abusives (v. égal., à propos de l’arrêt d’appel, C. Jalicot, obs. ss Versailles, 15 févr. 2018, LPA 2018, n° 135, p. 13). En effet, ce n’est aucunement le critère retenu par les textes. L’article L. 212-1 du code de la consommation retient une approche différente : « dans les contrats conclus entre professionnels et consommateurs, sont abusives les clauses qui ont pour objet ou pour effet de créer, au détriment du consommateur, un déséquilibre significatif entre les droits et obligations des parties au contrat ». Pire, le droit français de la consommation n’interdit pas qu’une clause négociée soit finalement qualifiée d’abusive. De plus, l’article 3 de la directive n° 93/13/CEE du 5 avril 1993, s’il vise bien les clauses n’ayant pas fait l’objet d’une négociation individuelle, ne les condamne pas ipso facto : « une clause d’un contrat n’ayant pas fait l’objet d’une négociation individuelle est considérée comme abusive lorsque, en dépit de l’exigence de bonne foi, elle crée au détriment du consommateur un déséquilibre significatif entre les droits et obligations des parties découlant du contrat ». En définitive, ce n’est pas l’absence de négociation qui condamne une clause ; et fort heureusement d’ailleurs, car le consommateur négocie rarement les clauses de ses contrats ! Cependant, si le raisonnement ne se tient pas en termes de clause abusive, on comprend mal pour quelle raison la charge de la preuve pèse sur le professionnel, alors que c’est précisément l’intérêt d’une classification au sein des clauses grises.

Faut-il comprendre qu’il n’y a pas de consentement à une clause si elle n’a pas fait l’objet d’une négociation ? La solution est déroutante, même pour un consommateur. Elle deviendrait effrayante en dehors du droit de la consommation, dès lors que la plupart des clauses compromissoires intégrées dans les contrats sont des clauses types et qu’elles ne font l’objet d’aucune négociation individuelle.

La solution paraît d’autant plus étonnante qu’il nous semble que certaines clauses compromissoires, sans pour autant faire l’objet d’une négociation, ne sont pas nécessairement génératrices d’un déséquilibre. Que doit-on penser d’une clause par laquelle le professionnel s’engage à prendre à sa charge l’intégralité des frais d’arbitrage avec une procédure dématérialisée et une sentence rendue dans des délais raisonnables ? Naturellement, on peut être hostile, par principe, à l’arbitrage en matière de droit de la consommation ; mais lorsqu’on ne l’est pas, est-il véritablement satisfaisant de considérer que le critère pertinent est celui de l’absence de négociation ?

On est donc particulièrement mal à l’aise face à cette solution, d’autant qu’un raisonnement classique en termes de déséquilibre significatif, appuyé par la présomption fixée par le code de la consommation, permet d’aboutir à une solution identique.

C – Une solution alternative ?

On peut sans doute se satisfaire du revirement opéré par la Cour de cassation. La solution était attendue. Mais son fondement inquiète. D’abord, l’arrêt contribue à émousser le principe compétence-compétence et ouvre la voie à de nouvelles contestations. Ensuite, il maintient une différence de régime pour les consommateurs, entre le consommateur dans un contrat interne (lequel peut se prévaloir de l’inopposabilité de la clause compromissoire de l’art. 2061 c. civ.) et le consommateur dans un contrat international. La même différence de régime se retrouve d’ailleurs entre le contrat de travail international (la clause est inopposable) et le contrat de consommation international. Enfin, il laisse potentiellement sur le bord du chemin des parties qui ne pourraient pas prétendre à la qualification de consommateur et qui, pourtant, mériteraient de faire l’objet d’une protection.

Une autre approche était-elle envisageable ? Sans doute. Au XXIe siècle, les contrats sont de plus en plus internationaux. En effet, tout un chacun conclut au quotidien – ou presque – des contrats contenant des éléments d’extranéité. Ainsi du passager de transport aérien qui achète un voyage avec une compagnie nationale vers une destination étrangère. Ainsi de l’internaute qui s’inscrit sur un réseau social dont le siège est situé à l’étranger. Ainsi du e-shopper qui achète un produit auprès d’un marchand implanté dans un pays voisin. Dans ces hypothèses, la partie n’a quasiment jamais conscience de conclure un contrat international. Et d’ailleurs, l’est-il vraiment ?

En droit de l’arbitrage, le critère de l’internationalité n’est pas le critère juridique. L’article 1504 du code de procédure civile retient le critère économique : « Est international l’arbitrage qui met en cause des intérêts du commerce international ». Plus précisément, la jurisprudence évoque anciennement le « mouvement de flux et de reflux au-dessus des frontières, des conséquences réciproques dans un pays et dans un autre » (Civ., 17 mai 1927, DP 1928. I. 25, concl. Matter, note H. Capitant). Très concrètement, il est peut-être temps de se demander si ce critère, qui date de près d’un siècle, ne doit pas être nouvellement interprété à l’aune des évolutions de notre société (sur ces critères, C. Seraglini et J. Ortscheidt, Droit de l’arbitrage interne et international, Domat, Droit privé, LGDJ, 2019, n° 30 (pour le critère de la commercialité) et n° 35 (pour l’internationalité)). Le critère n’est d’ailleurs, en lui-même, absolument pas discutable. Très simplement, et sans faire de publicité, pour l’achat d’une paire de chaussures à 50 € sur le site Zalando, dont les mentions légales indiquent un siège en Allemagne, le contrat met-il vraiment en cause les intérêts du commerce international et entraîne-t-il des conséquences réciproques dans un pays et dans l’autre ? N’est-il pas nécessaire de prévoir une appréciation mesurée de l’internationalité (dont les critères exacts restent à déterminer) afin d’éviter un déclenchement trop brusque du régime de l’arbitrage international ? D’ailleurs, l’arbitrage Tapie n’a-t-il pas ouvert la voie, en retenant une appréciation restrictive de l’internationalité (Paris, 17 févr. 2015, n° 13/13278, Sté CDR créances c/ Sté CDR-Consortium de réalisation, Dalloz actualité, 20 févr. 2015, obs. X. Delpech ; ibid. 18 déc. 2015, obs. F. Mélin ; D. 2015. 1253 Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité , note D. Mouralis Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; ibid. 425, édito. T. Clay Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; ibid. 2031, obs. L. d’Avout et S. Bollée Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; Rev. arb. 2015. 832, note P. Mayer ; JCP 2015. 289, note S. Bollée ; Procédures avr. 2015. Étude 4, obs. L. Weiller ; Cah. arb. 2015. 281, note A. de Fontmichel ; Gaz. Pal. 2015, n° 94, p. 17, note M. Boissavy ; ibid., n° 167, p. 22, obs. M. Nioche ; Bull. ASA 2016. 207, note M. Henry ; Civ. 1re, 30 juin 2016, nos 15-13.755, 15-13.904, 15-14.145, Dalloz actualité, 30 août 2016, obs. X. Delpech ; D. 2016. 1505 Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; ibid. 2025, obs. L. d’Avout et S. Bollée Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; ibid. 2589, obs. T. Clay Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; Rev. crit. DIP 2017. 245, note J.-B. Racine Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; JCP 2016. 954, note S. Bollée ; Procédures 2016, n° 290, obs. L. Weiller ; Rev. arb. 2016. 1123, note P. Mayer ; Cah. arb. 2017. 339, note M. Henry) ?

Naturellement, cette évolution du critère a des conséquences bien au-delà du consommateur. Mais est-ce pour autant un mal ? Ce faisant, on peut réaliser un tri plus fin entre les contrats pour lesquels l’internationalité est « fortuite » et ceux qui résultent d’une véritable dynamique. D’ailleurs, rien n’interdit de s’approprier les critères posés par l’article 6 du Règlement Rome I (le professionnel « a) exerce son activité professionnelle dans le pays dans lequel le consommateur a sa résidence habituelle, ou b) par tout moyen, dirige cette activité vers ce pays ou vers plusieurs pays, dont celui-ci ») pour éviter une admonestation de la Cour de justice.

Quel est l’intérêt de cette démarche ? Il n’est pas seulement de faire bénéficier du régime de l’arbitrage interne des articles 1442 et suivants du code de procédure civile. Il est surtout dans la faculté retrouvée d’appliquer l’article 2061 du code civil ! En effet, on l’a rappelé, l’internationalité de l’arbitrage interdit l’application de cette disposition en vertu de la jurisprudence Dalico/Zanzi. Si l’arbitrage redevient interne, l’article 2061 du code civil permet au consommateur de se prévaloir de l’inopposabilité de la clause compromissoire. Les intérêts de la solution sont multiples.

Premièrement, on peut retrouver une unité de régime. Ainsi, le travailleur, le consommateur, mais aussi celui qui n’a « pas contracté dans le cadre de son activité » bénéficient tous de l’inopposabilité de clause, sans besoin de recourir à un texte spécial. Il suffit pour cela que le contrat soit qualifié d’interne au regard du nouveau critère.

Deuxièmement, on peut exclure du bénéfice de ces dispositions les hypothèses où le contrat est international en application de ce nouveau critère. Le consommateur qui irait acheter son véhicule de luxe à l’étranger ne pourrait pas se prévaloir, comme c’est le cas aujourd’hui, de l’article 2061 du code civil et ne pourrait pas non plus obtenir la mise à l’écart de l’effet négatif.

Troisièmement, on préserve le principe compétence-compétence. D’une part, l’application de l’article 2061 du code civil ne remet aucunement en cause le principe, puisque l’inopposabilité évite un débat sur la compétence. D’autre part, on peut maintenir l’application du principe dans toutes les hypothèses où le contrat est international, sans aucune exception.

Reste à savoir si une telle voie est plus simple à suivre que celle retenue par la Cour de cassation. Difficile à dire avec certitude. Néanmoins, elle nécessite uniquement de répondre à deux questions : d’abord, le contrat est-il interne ou international ; ensuite, si et seulement si le contrat est interne, l’une des parties est-elle un non-professionnel (formule retenue par l’article 2061 du code civil) ? L’une et l’autre de ces questions sont tranchées en application du droit français, puisqu’il s’agit d’une simple question de qualification, réalisée lege fori.

En tout état de cause, cette piste, comme de nombreuses autres, doit être explorée. Il est désormais temps pour la doctrine arbitragiste de se saisir de cet arrêt afin de préserver au mieux la cohérence du droit de l’arbitrage.

II – Le principe compétence-compétence

L’arrêt PWC n’est pas le seul rendu le par la Cour de cassation le 30 septembre 2020. Un autre arrêt est également rendu, à nouveau sur le principe compétence-compétence (Civ. 1re, 30 sept. 2020, n° 19-15.728, Matisa). Dans le cadre de la fourniture d’un train, la société ETF a eu recours à la société Matisa Suisse. Elle a ensuite commandé à la société Matisa France, filiale de Matisa Suisse, de nouveaux ressorts d’essieux. À la suite d’un déraillement, elle a assigné ces sociétés et son assureur devant le tribunal de commerce. La société Matisa Suisse a soulevé l’existence d’une clause compromissoire contenue dans ses conditions générales de livraison.

La question posée est celle de l’application de la clause à l’ensemble du litige. La cour d’appel a fait application du principe compétence-compétence et accueilli l’exception d’incompétence. Le pourvoi est rejeté. Pour l’essentiel, la Cour de cassation relève l’appréciation souveraine des juges du fond sur cette question. Néanmoins, elle illustre, de la part de la cour d’appel, une méconnaissance du principe compétence-compétence. La Cour de cassation retient que « la cour d’appel a souverainement admis l’existence d’un engagement, à l’initiative de la société ETF, des trois parties dans des opérations techniques impliquant le recours au savoir-faire des deux sociétés Matisa. Elle a pu en déduire que la clause d’arbitrage stipulée dans les conditions générales de la société Matisa Suisse, dont la société ETF avait pleinement connaissance pour les avoir acceptées lors de la commande du train, s’appliquait manifestement au litige ayant son origine dans l’intervention des sociétés Matisa ». Ainsi, la cour ne caractérise pas l’absence d’inapplicabilité manifeste ; à l’opposé, elle caractérise une « applicabilité manifeste » en appliquant la jurisprudence relative à l’extension de clause. Ce faisant, elle tranche de façon anticipée le débat sur la compétence et viole l’effet négatif.

L’arrêt est néanmoins cassé, en ce que la cour d’appel a désigné la cour d’arbitrage de la chambre de commerce internationale de Paris, en violation de l’article 81 du code de procédure civile. Toutefois, la Cour de cassation use de la faculté offerte par l’article L. 411-3, alinéa 2, du code de l’organisation judiciaire pour renvoyer les parties à mieux se pourvoir.

III – Les cas d’ouverture du recours

A – Le caractère contradictoire de la procédure

Le respect du calendrier d’arbitrage justifie-t-il rejeter une demande de production d’une attestation de témoin ? Telle est en substance la question posée à la cour d’appel de Paris (Paris, 29 sept. 2020, n° 19/11695, Periscoop). L’une des parties conteste le refus de l’arbitre de faire droit à sa demande de produire une déclaration de témoin, là où son adversaire a pu produire une telle déclaration. Dans le cadre de la procédure, l’arbitre, en accord avec les parties, a fixé une date limite pour la production de telles attestations. C’est postérieurement à cette date que la demande discutée a été formulée. L’arbitre, après avoir soumis cette question à la discussion des parties, a rejeté la demande, au motif qu’« en l’absence d’un accord entre les Parties postérieurement à l’Ordonnance de procédure n° 1 afin de déroger à ce calendrier procédural et en l’absence d’un troisième jeu d’écritures prévu ou convenu entre les Parties, le Tribunal arbitral ne peut pas accepter que la Défenderesse produise des attestations de témoins avec son Deuxième Mémoire ».

Le moyen est rejeté. La cour retient que la décision a été prise « au regard des dates impératives du calendrier de la procédure, soumis de surcroît aux dispositions de la procédure accélérée, auquel il n’y avait pas lieu de déroger dès lors que les parties avaient sur un pied d’égalité disposé du même temps et de l’opportunité de produire des attestations de témoins dans des délais acceptés ». La cour fait ainsi prévaloir la sécurité de la procédure et évite de faire droit aux manœuvres dilatoires dans le cadre d’une procédure accélérée. Deux questions se posent néanmoins. D’une part, la solution aurait-elle été identique en dehors du cadre spécifique de la procédure accélérée ? D’autre part, la cour fait deux fois mention de l’absence d’explications de la partie sur sa demande. La solution aurait-elle été différente en présence de telles explications ?

On évoquera aussi rapidement un autre arrêt de la cour d’appel (Paris, 15 sept. 2020, n° 18/01360), dans le contentieux sériel avec l’entreprise Subway. La cour rappelle que « le principe de la contradiction exige seulement que les parties aient pu faire connaître leurs prétentions de fait et de droit et discuter celles de leur adversaire de sorte que rien de ce qui a servi à fonder la décision des arbitres n’ait échappé à leur débat contradictoire ». À ce titre, une partie qui n’a pas participé à la procédure, mais qui a reçu « par e-mail », « via UPS » ou « via Federal Express » l’ensemble des actes de la procédure arbitrale ne peut invoquer une violation du contradictoire.

B – Arbitrage et procédures collectives

L’articulation d’une procédure arbitrale avec une procédure collective requiert une vigilance accrue de la part des arbitres qui, dans le cadre de leur mission, ne doivent pas empiéter sur la compétence exclusive du juge de la faillite (D. Cohen, note ss Civ. 1re, 6 mai 2009, Rev. arb. 2010. 299, spéc. p. 305 : « L’arbitrage entretient des rapports complexes et subtils avec la matière des faillites : si l’arbitrabilité du droit des procédures collectives ne fait plus aujourd’hui de doute, il n’en reste pas moins que l’arbitre ne saurait empiéter sur la compétence exclusive du juge de la faillite – notamment pour ouvrir une procédure collective du débiteur, recevoir les déclarations de créances ou nommer des représentants de la procédure – et qu’il ne saurait violer des règles d’ordre public interne, voire international, du droit des faillites, teinté de considérations d’intérêt général manifestes »). La violation de certaines règles relatives aux procédures collectives est de nature à entraîner l’annulation de la sentence arbitrale. Si l’arbitre est compétent pour déterminer le montant d’une créance à l’égard d’une société en procédure collective, il ne peut condamner le débiteur à payer cette somme (v. sur cette question P. Ancel, Arbitrage et procédures collectives, Rev. arb. 1983. 275 ; P. Ancel, Arbitrage et procédures collectives après la loi du 25 janvier 1985, Rev. arb. 1987. 127 ; P. Fouchard, Arbitrage et faillite, Rev. arb. 1998. 471).

C’est ce principe qui est rappelé par la cour d’appel de Paris (Paris, 15 sept. 2020, n° 19/09580, Sharmel). Elle énonce que « le principe de l’arrêt des poursuites individuelles qui est à la fois d’ordre public interne et international, interdit après l’ouverture de la procédure collective la saisine du tribunal arbitral par un créancier dont la créance a son origine antérieurement au jugement d’ouverture, sans qu’il se soit soumis, au préalable, à la procédure de vérification des créances et en tout état de cause, que la décision rendue puisse conduire au prononcé d’une condamnation, seule la fixation de la créance étant admise ».

En l’espèce, la cour reconnaît implicitement que le tribunal arbitral a été saisi postérieurement à l’ouverture de la procédure collective. Pour cela, elle fixe la date de saisine du tribunal à la signature de l’acte de mission (le 3 juillet 2017), postérieurement à l’ouverture de la procédure (le 15 mai 2017). Néanmoins, la demande d’arbitrage date du 26 septembre 2016. On peut se demander s’il n’était pas possible de retenir une date antérieure à la conclusion de l’acte de mission pour l’acceptation par l’arbitre unique de sa mission.

Quoi qu’il en soit, ce n’est pas ce grief qui emporte la conviction de la cour. En effet, l’arbitre unique a condamné la société placée en redressement judiciaire au paiement de certaines sommes, « au mépris du principe d’égalité des créanciers et d’arrêt des poursuites individuelles ». La sanction est donc inévitable : la sentence viole l’ordre public international et l’ordonnance d’exequatur est infirmée.

C – Arbitrage et corruption

La corruption est désormais une question classique du droit de l’arbitrage. Force est de constater que les arbitres y sont de plus en plus sensibilisés, puisqu’ils n’hésitent pas à sanctionner un contrat qu’ils estiment entaché de telles circonstances. C’est le cas d’une sentence déférée à la cour d’appel de Paris (Paris, 15 sept. 2020, n° 19/09058, Samwell). Dans le cadre de la vente d’hélicoptères en Chine, un opérateur a eu recours à un intermédiaire. Finalement, le vendeur a refusé de payer le montant des factures et l’intermédiaire a saisi une juridiction arbitrale. L’arbitre a retenu l’existence d’indices de corruption de sorte que l’exécution des contrats viole l’ordre public international. Le débat devant la cour d’appel, s’il est articulé autour de plusieurs moyens, est centré autour de la question de la mission de l’arbitre.

Le contrat prévoit l’application du droit français. Or le demandeur au recours estime que l’arbitre devait se tenir aux critères de la corruption prévus par l’arrêt Alstom (Paris, 10 avr. 2018, n° 16/11182, D. 2018. 1934, obs. L. d’Avout et S. Bollée Arbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité ; ibid. 2448, obs. T. ClayArbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité; RTD com. 2020. 283, obs. E. LoquinArbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité; Rev. arb. 2018. 574, note E. Gaillard ; Paris, 28 mai 2019, n° 16/11182, D. 2019. 1956, obs. L. d’Avout, S. Bollée et E. FarnouxArbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité; ibid. 2435, obs. T. ClayArbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité; RTD com. 2020. 283, obs. E. LoquinArbitration column the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and - Arbitration column: the Court of Cassation sinks the Jaguar and the Rado - Dalloz actualité; Rev. arb. 2018. 574, note E. Gaillard ; Cah. arb. 2018. 465, note A. Pinna) et lui reproche d’avoir fait application de critères issus du droit américain, tirés de la doctrine des red flags. La cour rejette fermement le moyen. Elle énonce, d’une part, que « le fait pour le tribunal arbitral d’avoir, pour caractériser la corruption, examiné des indices de corruption avancés par la société Airbus H., fussent-il inspirés des “red flags” issus de la liste annexée à l’US Foreign Corrupt Practices Act de 1977, loi fédérale américaine et/ou résultant d’un guide établi en 2012 par la division criminelle du Département de Justice américain, ne peut conduire à considérer qu’il a fait, même partiellement, application de la loi américaine pour trancher ce litige ». Elle retient, d’autre part, qu’« il ne ressort nullement de cette décision (Alstom) que cette liste devrait être regardée comme limitative en droit français » et ajoute que « quand bien même aurait-elle été envisagée comme telle par la cour en 2018, elle ne saurait en aucune manière lier une autre juridiction, à défaut de consécration par la loi d’une liste limitative s’imposant au juge quant aux indices à prendre en compte pour caractériser une corruption, à l’exclusion de tout autre ». La solution est heureuse. Il est paradoxal d’interdire à un arbitre d’user de tous les outils existants pour identifier un contrat de corruption à une époque où la lutte contre ce fléau est considérée comme une priorité.

Néanmoins, le raisonnement, tel qu’il est mené par la cour d’appel, présente une sérieuse limite. La cour prend en effet la peine de mentionner l’usage de la notion de « faisceau d’indices », du recours à la preuve par indices « graves, précis et concordants » pour juger que « le tribunal arbitral a bien fait une application exclusive du droit français quand bien même il a pu considérer que certains indices, aujourd’hui aussi retenus par la législation américaine, pouvaient être pris en compte pour caractériser la corruption, sans se départir de l’application du droit français ». Cette motivation nous paraît dangereuse. À la suivre, dès lors que les parties ont fait le choix d’un droit applicable au contrat, l’examen de la corruption doit être réalisé en contemplation de ce droit. À défaut, l’arbitre viole sa mission. On comprend alors immédiatement qu’il suffit aux parties de choisir, lors de la conclusion du contrat, un droit beaucoup plus permissif pour échapper à la corruption. La cour d’appel se retrouve face à une situation insoluble : l’arbitre qui a refusé d’appliquer le droit étranger pour établir des faits de corruption viole sa mission (mais la sentence est conforme à l’ordre public international) ; l’arbitre qui a appliqué scrupuleusement le droit étranger permissif viole l’ordre public international (mais il a respecté sa mission !). Cette voie n’est évidemment pas sérieusement envisageable. La solution réside sans doute dans l’alinéa 2 de l’article 1511 du code de procédure civile, selon lequel l’arbitre « tient compte, dans tous les cas, des usages du commerce ». Il est tout à fait admissible de considérer que la lutte contre la corruption intègre désormais ces usages et que les arbitres sont libres d’y piocher les outils pour y faire face, indépendamment de l’État les ayant forgés.

Deux griefs supplémentaires sont écartés. Si l’arbitre doit naturellement motiver sa sentence en appréciant l’existence d’un faisceau d’indices susceptibles de caractériser des faits de corruption, il n’a pas nécessairement à entrer dans le détail pour chacun des indices qu’il retient, la cour précisant que « le juge de l’annulation (ne peut) en apprécier la suffisance ou la pertinence ». Enfin, l’arbitre peut évidemment se fonder sur des circonstances dans les débats, quand bien même les parties n’ont pas insisté sur ce point, sans violer le contradictoire.

Categories Cars

Leave a Comment